Summer Cruise 2019 – Phase II

Our return to Glasgow almost two weeks later, Wednesday 10 July.  Joined by Tanya (to crew on Phyllis) who had travelled from North Wales to meet up at Warrington Bank Quay before we picked up Tom at Preston railway station. We arrived early afternoon at Dumbarton and were met by Douglas, our host at the marina.  Both Phyllis and Spray had been well looked after at Sandpoint Marina. Especially considering what the river can do to the boats if they are not looked after.

For those who aren't aware Sandpoint was the place where the Cutty Sark was built.  By the time we got ourselves and the boats sorted we joined Douglas for a beer and something to eat in the town.

The River Leven. Can you spot four wrecks? There were actually six wrecks in the vicinity.

The following day saw our breakfast at Denny's, the Denny Ship Model Experiment Tank (the last building remaining from the shipbuilding days) which forms part of the Scottish Maritime Museum.  After breakfast, a must-visit as this was the first commercial ship model testing tank built in the world and it retains many original features today: a water tank as long as a football pitch, clay moulding beds for casting wax model ship hulls and the original Victorian machinery used for shaping models.

L-R: Tanya, Tom, Douglas with Big Bertha in the rear.

Then off to the supermarket for victualling the boats with the afternoon on Douglas's RIB upriver to see the upper Clyde and Big Bertha (huge crane), the paddle steamer Waverley and the new navy ship builds by BAE.

The Waverley on berth awaiting repair!

A visit too, for Tanya and Tom to the recently opened Glasgow Distillery - No Whiskey there yet!  While Douglas and Kevin visited the wonderful River Side museum and went aboard the tall ship 'Glenlee'.  That evening we all enjoyed a wonderful meal at the 'Sugarboat', down the line in Helensburgh. Highly recommended.

Friday 12 July and we said our goodbyes to Douglas and headed down the Clyde.  In harmony with the music played by Tanya on her Penny Whistle, as she did on every departure whilst on the Clyde.  A great sail towards the Isle of Bute with berthing at Port Bannatyne.  A short bus ride to Rothesay for a visit to the famous and not to missed, Victorian toilets.  And then an evening meal in a local hostelry prior to catching a taxi back to the marina.

The following day we departed, to Tanya's music, to sail through the Kyles of Bute.  What a marvellous passage along the fjord passing through the Burnt Islands before sailing south past Tighnabruaich and Kames in the West Kyle.  It's here that a sudden wind shift saw Phyllis's jib part from the end of the bowsprit.  A swift dropping of the halyard and pulling in of the sail sorted it all out in double-quick fashion.

Then around Ardlamont Point and in a northwesterly direction on Loch Fyne brought us to one of the most astonishing marinas on the Clyde, Portavadie.  The complex was originally built for the purpose of constructing concrete oil rigs.  After an immediate move to steel platforms, the facility became redundant and after a little time, it was developed to a marina complex, opened in 2010.  Five-star luxury apartments, private sauna facilities, a restaurant and conference centre.

Never the less the rock blasting at Portavadie and the resulting very deep water intended for building oil platforms has left an excellent and well-sheltered marina.  Well worth a visit, a refuel, an evening meal and breakfast.

Sunday 14 July and we started our homeward bound sail.  Exceptionally becalmed conditions saw us motor-sail southwards to Troon.  Another well-protected marina and a wonderful seafood meal in a very busy Scott's Restaurant on the marina complex.

Monday and we ventured along the South Ayrshire coastline passing Ayr, Turnberry Golf Course with Alsa Craig always within sight in the far distance.  Girvan was our next port of call en route to Port Patrick and then onto Peel (IOM).  Well, that was the plan!   A meal on board before a restful night and an early start.

Time to depart, engines started and into gear.  Phyllis would not budge!  Forward and reverse gears were selected, still, no way would she would go!  The gearbox was suspected.  The harbour master contacted as well as the local ship repairers and marine engineers.  Alas, it was the Scottish wake weeks and no one was available to help.  Reluctantly Phyllis was left in Girvan and everyone, Tanya, Kevin & Tom started on our way home on Spray.

The plan was now to return to Deganwy as quickly as possible so the next leg saw us landfall in Peel (IOM) in the wee hours and then after some rest and recovery an evening departure directly to Deganwy. Arriving late afternoon on Thursday 18 July.  Two and half days after leaving Phyllis in Girvan.

It's another story but Phyllis was eventually repaired after a couple of trips back to Girvan before moving her to Troon for approx six weeks prior to winter berthing Phyllis in the inner Clyde at Largs Marina, where she is now currently berthed until the spring of 2020.

Photos by Tom, Tanya & Kevin
[click any image & scroll through the gallery]

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